Directory of Streets

​This list of locations in Brompton contains ‘official’ names for the various streets, alleys, courts and other landmarks as well as some of the well known ‘local’ names for them. The dates given are guides only and some names may have started earlier or continued in use longer than the dates indicated.

Name

Location

Known Dates

Admiralty Terrace

A terrace on the north side of Lower Wood Street.

1880s-present

Amherst Hill

Part of the army married quarters built in the 1960s, the road is named after the Hill on which it is built. Runs from Maxwell Road west to Khartoum Road.

1960s-present

Amherst Redoubt

A set of four detached Army married quarters built on the site of, and named after, the fortified position known as Amherst Redoubt. This was the strong-point of Fort Amherst.

1969-present

Barfleur Manor

Between Middle Street and Wood Street, built in the 1950s. Named after HMS Barfleur.

1955-present

Battery Field

The open area in front of the Lower Lines.

c.1800-50

Best Street

A street laid out for building in the 1740s, but probably never actually built. It ran south off Garden Street, parallel to and between Prospect Row and Maxwell Road

1740s?

Black Lion Field

The field between the Brompton Barrier and Fox Lane (Mill Road), named from the Black Lion pub which stood on both sides of it at different times.

c.1750s-present

Boundary Passage

An alley that ran outside the wall of Brompton Barracks, parallel to Lower Wood Street. Named as it formed the boundary between Brompton and the Barracks.

1890s-present

Broad Alley

Behind Brompton High Street between Wood Street and Westcourt Street, perhaps originally including Butcher’s Alley. Part of Rogers’ original grid plan.

1697-present

Brompton Barrier

The gate and drawbridge in Chatham Lines between Prince Edward’s Bastion and Prince Henry’s Bastion. It marked the joining of Wood Street and Brompton Road. Demolished in 1878. Was situated between the Garrison Gymnasium and the junction of Brompton Road and Prince Arthur Road.

1756-1878

Brompton Bumps

The Paddock/Walnut Tree Field. Name used by some of the local children in the early 21st century

c.2000-present

Brompton Common

Location not certain, but probably the part of the Outer Lines now occupied by the R.E. Museum, Prince Charles Hotel and Black Lion Sports Complex. May once have applied to most of Great Lines (2).

18th C.

Brompton Court

Off Lower Wood Street, probably the same as Brunton’s Court.

1870s

Brompton Hill (1)

The hill between Brompton and Chatham. Melville Hospital was built on the early 19th century. Originally it may also have applied to the hill Chatham Barracks was built on.

17th C. to present

Brompton Hill (2)

The road running diagonally up Brompton Hill (1) from Dock Road to the High Street. Now also includes the loop of road through Melville Court.

18th C. to present.

Brompton Hill (3)

A row of houses built c.1985 along the path from Brompton Hill (2) to Prospect Row.

c.1985-present

Brompton House

A large house at the north-western end of Wood Street built in the early 1700s, perhaps serving as the manor house. Was used as a school in the late 19th century. Burned down c.1912.

c.1715-c1912

Brompton Lane

Listed in a 1447 document, this is probably Brompton Road (Gilingham) and Wood Street.

15th-18th C.

Brompton Road (Chatham)

Dock Road, specifically the section near St. Mary’s Church, is listed in some directories and documents as Brompton Road.

1830s-60s

Brompton Road (Gillingham)

The main road from Brompton to New Brompton, running from the Brompton Barrier (in Chatham Lines) to Fox Lane (now Mill Road). Formerly Brompton Lane. Its course was altered in the 1750s to pass through the Brompton Barrier.

18th C. to present

Brompton Street.

This name was used for the High Street in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. Part of Rogers’ original grid plan.

1695-1720s

Brunton’s Court

A court of 6 tenements between Wood Street and Frederick Place. Also known as Brompton Court.

1860s

Butcher’s Alley

Behind Brompton High Street between Westcourt Street and New Cut. May once have been part of Broad Alley. Part of Rogers’ original grid plan.

>1860-present

Butchers Court

Off Westcourt Street close to Butcher’s Alley. May have been another name for Butcher’s Alley.

1870s

Buttercup Field

The field on Amherst Hill south of the Garrison Church.

1930s-1950s

Camperdown Manor

Corner of Middle Street and River Street, built in the 1960s. Named after HMS Camperdown.

1960s-present

Carpenter’s Lane

At the upper end of (or possibly part of) Wood Street, probably derived from the land-owner/tenant Mr. Carpenter. Name in a document of 1774.

18th C.

Carpenter’s Row

Exact location unknown, there was a large fire here in 1787. Possibly on  Carpenter’s Lane

1780s

Cat’s Eyes

The Caponier between Prince of Wales Bastion and King’s Bastion. Got its mane from two partially bricked up arches inside it that resembled a pair of  cat’s eyes. The effect was often enhanced by someone adding a half brick to each to form the ‘pupil’.

1950s-1980s

Catt’s Field

Another name for Black Lion Field, after a local grazier.

c.1800-50

Chapel Alley

Off Middle Street behind the King’s Head. Also called Chapel Court. Part of Masonic Hall.

1880s-1890s

Chapel Court (1)

Near the Wesleyan Chapel in Manor Street.

1870s

Chapel Court (2)

Off Middle Street behind the King’s Head. Also called Chapel Alley.

1900s

Church Lane

Unknown location. Appears in an 1847 directory for Brompton. May be another name for Church Path.

1847

Church Path

Ran from the Brompton Barrier across the Outer Lines to Gillingham Church. The first part became the Brompton End of Prince Edward (now Prince Arthur) Road c.1880. It still exists as the footpath running from Prince Arthur Road across the Lines to Mill Road (where its continuation became Saunders Street and Burnt Oak Terrace). Before the building of Chatham Lines in 1756 it had been a little further south, running from Garden Street.

c.1700-present

Conway Mews

On the site of the old Holy Trinity Church and School, incorporationg the old school buildings and Conway Hall. Built in the late 1980s-1990s.

1990s-present

Cumberland Lines

The southern section of Chatham Lines from Ordnance Wharf to Prince William’s Bastion. Named after the Duke of Cumberland.

1758-c.1800

Dark Lane

The road across the Outer Lines from the Sally Port (1) to Canterbury Street. The eastern end became Pagett Street, the Western end became Sally Port Gardens. Before the building of the Lines it may have run a little further to the west.

To mid-19th C.

Dock Lane

The lane from Chatham church to the dockyard gate. Later Dock Road.

17th-early 18th C.

Dock Road

The road from Chatham church to the Dockyard gate. In the 1950s it was widened and extended to Wood Street, causing the demolition of the northern part of River Street. Following the Dockyard closure in the 1980s the name was applied also to St. Mary’s Vale.

18th C.-present

Dolphin Alley

Between the High Street and Middle Street behind the Dolphin Public House. May be the same As Dolphin’s Court.

1870s

Dolphin Court

Between the High Street and Middle Street behind the Dolphin Public House. May be the same as Dolphin’s Alley. Also spelled Dolfin’s Court.

1870s

Engineer Cottage

In Brompton somewhere, presumably close to the Royal Engineer Barracks.

1870s

Estuary Reach

A development of flats built in the 1990s on the site of the old Brompton (Tickel’s) Dairy at the end of Pleasant Row.

1990s-present

Fieldworks Road

From Pasley Road towards the junction of Khyber Road/Dock Road.

1957-present

Fieldworks Terrace

In Brompton Barracks, forerunner to Fieldworks Road?

1930s-1958

Flaxman’s Alley

An alley from Manor Street to the back of the High Street, probably from a personal name. Also known as Flaxsmith’s Alley.

1870s-1900s

Flaxman’s Court (1)

Off Manor Street, probably part of Flaxman’s Alley.

1900s

Flaxman’s Court (2)

A cul-de-sac between Manor Street and the High Street built in the 1980s, named after the earlier Flaxman’s Court in the same area.

1980s-present

Flaxsmith Alley

Another name for Flaxman’s Alley

1860s

Foord’s Stables

Probably in St. Mary’s Vale

1870s

Fortune of War Alley

Behind the Fortune of War Public House in Wood Street.

1870s

Frederick Place

A terrace of 6 houses at the north end of River Row, adjoining the Swan Pub.

1860s

Ganden’s Alley

Off Manor street between Flaxman’s Alley and Slate Yard. Probably another name for Gausdon’s Alley. Sometimes spelled Gandon’s Alley.

1870s-1900s

Gandon’s Court

Another name for Gandon’s Alley.

1930s-1947

Garden Row

Off Garden Street, another name for Queens Court

1890s-1940s

Garden Street

Named for the fruit gardens (orchards) of Westcourt Manor that once stood to between this road and Wood Street. Probably originally a path from the orchard to the manor. Runs from the High Street to Mazwell Road and once incorporated Sally Port (2). Grew as a residential street in the first half of the 18th century. Part of Rogers’ original grid plan.

c.1700-present

Gausdon’s Alley

Off Manor street between Flaxman’s Alley and Slate Yard. Probably another name for Ganden’s Alley.

1880s

Gibralter Avenue

Runs from Pasley Road to the R.E Museum.

1960-present

Gillingham Lane/Street

Part of the old Chatham to Gillingham road across the Outer Lines. Ran from Brompton Road (Gillingham) beside Westcourt Manor House to Church Path and then to the junction of Mill Road and Medway Road. Now Prince Arthur Road.

?-1880s?

Goodhands Court

Somewhere in Brompton

 

Gordon Road

Continuation of the High Street inside Brompton Barracks.

?-present

Graham Close

Off Westcourt Street to the south. Named after Lieutenant G. Graham R.E. who won the V.C. in the Crimean War 1855. Formerly Westcourt Alley.

1958-present

Great Lines (1)

Originally this term applied to the centre part of the Chatham Lines between the Cumberland Lines and Ligonieres Lines, from Prince William’s Bastion to Prince Frederick’s Bastion.

1756-c.1800

Great Lines (2)

This term was later applied to the open ‘killing ground’ in front of Great Lines (1), originally designated the Outer Lines. Now also referred to as the ‘Field of Fire’.

c.1800-present

Great Lines (3)

Northernmost line of Army housing built in 1969-70 on the Great Lines (2). Runs from Sally Port Gardens to Kings Bastion (2).

1969-present

Green Court

Off 29 Middle Street, between Wood Street and Middle Street, probably derives from a personal name. 

1870s-1900s

Green’s Court

Behind 7 (41) Upper Wood Street. Sometimes also noted as Green Court.

1860s-1900s

Gymnasium Field

The part of the Inner Lines (1) between Wood Street and Sally Port (2), later named Inner Lines (2).

 

Hawkins Close

Built in the late 1980s off Bromton Hill (2) on the site of the old Melville Barracks and Admiralty Cutting factory.

c1985-present

Hewett Place

North side of Garden Street behind Manor Street.

1870s-1880s

High Street

Originally a path across open fields. The main street in Brompton, originally just called Brompton Street. The northern end once formed the main entrance to Brompton Barracks. Originally called Brompton Street.

c.1695-present

Inner Lines (1)

The open area behind the ramparts of Chatham Lines used for military purposes

1756-present

Inner Lines (2)

Between Sally Port and Wood Street, behind Prince Edward’s Bastion. Army Married Quarters built in 1951 with additions in the mid-1960s

1951-present.

Irish Alley

Somewhere in Brompton, presumably popular with Irish immigrants.

 

Jackson’s Court

Off Westcourt Street.

1870s

Jordan’s Passage

An alleyway running east from River Row between the Army & Navy and Royal Marine public houses. Possibly named from a Landlord of the Royal Marine.

c.1900-1940

Jordan’s Cottages

In the 1940s Jordan’s Passage was known by this name.

c.1940-48

Kharthoum Road

Runs from Dock Road to Maxwell Road, through Chatham/Kitchener Barracks. The part of it now occupied by Army Housing was built in the c.1968 incorporating the road that once ran through Upper Kitchener Barracks

?-Present

Khyber Road

From the Mill Road junction with Saunders Street to Dock Road (St. Mary’s Vale). Formed the boundary between Brompton Barracks and Pembrooke Barracks.

c.1967-present

Khyber Field

Part of lower lines just northeast of the junction of Kyber Road and Prince Arthur Road. Once known as Battery Field. Now the site of the Mid-Kent College.

c.1960s-1990s

King’s Bastion (1)

The southern of the two Bastions on Chatham Lines that lie Directly to the East of Brompton.

1756-present

King’s Bastion (2)

Outside King’s Bastion (1). Army Married Quarters built in the 1930s with additions in 1952 and 1969.

1939-present

King’s Court

A court of about a dozen tenements between Middle Street and the back of Westcourt Street, close to Broad Alley.

1860s-1900s

King’s Square

Probably King’s Court.

1880s

Laurel Cottage

At the rear of the royal Engineers Barracks.

1870s

Leitch Row

Between Wood Street and Boundary Passage. Named after Colour-Sergeant P. Leitch R.E. who won the V.C. in the Crimean War 1855.

1958-present

Lendrim Close

Off Westcourt Street to the south. Named after Corporal W. T. Lendrim R.E. who won the V.C. in the Crimean War 1855.

1958-present

Lennox Row

Between Wood Street and Boundary Passage. Named after Lieutenant W. O. Lennox R.E. won the V.C. in the Crimean War 1854. Formerly Strowse’s Buildings.

1958-present

Ligonieres Lines

The northern part of Chatham Lines from Prince Frederick’s Bastion back to the river (named after Viscount de Ligonieres).

 

Lizard Field

The grassy bank just below Belvedere Battery (Fort Amherst), south of the Barrier Ditch.

1930s-1950s

Manor Court

Between Manor Street and the rear of Mansion Row.

1860s-1900s

Manor Street

Originally a cul-de-sac running south from Wood Street. Appears in the mid-1730s In about 1900 the houses at the southern end were demolished, linking it to Garden Street. Named for Westcourt Manor which Brompton was a part of.

1730s-present

Mansion Court (1)

Tenement court behind Wood Street and Mansion Row. 

1860s-1900s

Mansion Court (2)

By the 1870s Mansion Row Court seems to have been known as Mansion Court. It may have been connected to Mansion Court (1) by this date.

1870s-1880s

Mansion Row

A street of grand houses built in the second half of the 18th century. The southernmost house (and probably the first in the Row) is named Mansion House, but whether it takes its name from the Row or vice versa is unclear. Runs south off Wood Street. In the 20th century the name was applied to that part of Military Road that runs beside it, from Wood Street to Garden Street.

1750s-present

Mansion Row Court

A court of tenements running from Mansion Row to the rear of the Harrow Public House in Manor Street

1860s

Maxwell Road

Runs from Garden Street to Amherst Redoubt. Was originally part of Military Road, renamed to Maxwell Road in about 1930. Named after Lieutenant General Sir Robert Maxwell KCB KCMG.

1930-present

May Terrace

First appears on the 1891 census and seems to have been built on the site of the ornamental gardens and rear of Brompton House, close to the barracks wall. After Brompton House was destroyed May Terrace expanded to replace the house.

1890s-present

McCudden Row

Between Westcourt Street and Middle Street. Named after Captain J. B. McCudden D.S.O. M.C. M.M. R.F.C. who won the V.C. in the Great War 1914-18.

1958-present

Melville Court

Situated on Brompton Hill (1) this complex of flats was built in the 1960s & 70s on the site of the Melville Naval Hospital (later Melville Royal Marines Barracks).

1960s-present

Middle Street

Runs from the High Street to River Street/Dock Road, parallel to, and between Wood Street and Westcourt, its central location giving rise to its name. Part of Rogers’ original grid plan.

c.1697-present

Military Road

The Military Road was built c.1800 and was a communication road running at the rear of Chatham Lines and from there to Fort Pitt. Part of it ran from Wood Street to Garden Street beside Mansion Row, and this section is know known simply as Mansion Row. The section from Garden Street to Amherst Redoubt was renamed to Maxwell Road in about 1930.

1800-1930

Miller’s Cottages

Four cottages behind 11 (18) Garden Street (north side). Now the garden behind Manor House.

1860s-1900s

Miller’s Court

Another name for Miller’s Cottages

1880s

Nelson Court (1)

Between the High Street and Wood Street, perhaps another name for Fortune of Wat Alley.

1880s

Nelson Court (2)

Off Westcourt Street, behind printing works.

1880s-c1949

New Cut

This road runs from the end of the High Street to DockRoad, beside Melville Hospital?Barracks/Court. Part of it adjoins and runs parallel to Pleasant Row.

1830s?-present

Pasely Road

Runs north from Wood Street into Brompton Barracks. Named after Major General C. Paseley, Chief Royal Engineer. Was once part of Military Road.

1850s?-present

Perie Row

Between Westcourt Street and Middle Street. Named after Sapper J. Perie R.E. who won the V.C. in the Crimean War 1855.

1958-present

Pleasant Row. 

A short row of houses running west from the southern end of the High Street, beside New Cut.

1830s?-present

Police Quarters

On Dock Road opposite Westcourt Street. Accomodation built for the Dockyard Police

1890s-present

Prince Arthur Road

Road from Wood Street to the junction of Mill Road and Medway Road. Formerly Prince Edward Road, and before that Gillingham Lane/Street. Named for Prince Arthur of Connaught. Also called Prince Arthur’s Road.

1897-present

Prince Edward Road

Road from Wood Street to the junction of Mill Road and Medway Road. Formerly Gillingham Lane/Street

c.1878-1897

Prince Edward’s Bastion

The southern of the two Bastions on Chatham Lines that lie Directly to the East of Brompton. From about 1800-1950s it was the site of R.E. Offices.

1756-present

Prospect Row

Runs south from Garden Street, named for its view down Brompton Hill (1) to the River and Dockyard. Laid out c.1710

c.1710-present

Queen’s Court

A row of 8 brick tenements built by James Hickes in 1746. Off Garden Street beside the Cannon Public House, backing on to Prospect Row. Also known as Cannon Alley. Demolished c.1952 and now the Cannon’s beer garden.

1746-c.1952

River Row

Ran between Westcourt Street and Wood Street, close to the Dockyard wall. Later became River Street.

c.1697-c.1890s

River Street

Later name for River Row. Due to road widening in the 1950s it now runs only from Westcourt Street to Middle Street.

c.1870-present

Sally Port (1)

A gateway in the Lines between King’s Bastion (1) and Prince Edward’s Bastion

1756-c.1960

Sally Port (2)

The section of road between Maxwell Road an Inner Lines (2). Originally considered an extension of Gaeden Street. Following the construction of six army houses in the mid 1920s it was often referred to as “Army Quarters, Garden Street” In the 1950s or 60s it was renamed to Sally Port.

c.1930s-present

Sally Port Gardens

When Army housing was built along the road across the lines in the 1930s, the section east of the Sally Port  was named Sally Port Gardens, the name extending along the road as more houses were built. Was once known as Dark Lane.

1938-present

Sawyers Alley

Ran from the High Street via a dogleg to Manor Street, taking its name from the Two Sawyers pub it runs beside. Much of it became Flaxman’s Court in the 1980s. Last recorded in electoral roll in 1957.

1840s?-present

Sawyers Passage

Another name for Sawyers Alley

1890s

School House

The schoolmaster’s residence attached to Trinity School in Military Road.

1870s

Singapore Drive

Runs between Sally Port Gardens and King’s Bastion (1). Built in the 1950s as Army housing.

1951-present

Slate Yard

Off Manor Street towards the High Street.

1870s-1900s

South Road

Road parallel to Wood Street joining Pasley Road and Gordon Road inside Brompton Barracks

c.1810?-present

St. Mary’s Vale

Ran from Middle Street to St. Mary’s Creek beside the Dockyard Wall. From the 1850s it also included the road beside the Convict Prison containing the prison staff’s accommodation.

1850s-present

Stable Yard

The chalk quarry near the dockyard gate, between New Cut and Westcourt Street housed a Teamster’s Yard and Stables for horses used in the Dockyard.

1880s

Strowse’s Buildings

A range of buildings on the northwest part of the High Street between Wood Street and the Barracks Gate, names after John Strowse the Gunsmith whose shop was here (and may have been the owner/builder of these properties). Also Spelled Strouses Buildings. Lennox Row now stands close to their location.

1840s-1939

Swan Garden(s)

The small green just north of the Dock Road roundabout. Before the diversion of Wood Street in the 1950s the Swan Pub stood here on the corner of Wood Street and River Street.

c.1958-present.

Tadman’s Court

North side of Westcourt Street between numbers 3 and 5.

1880s-1900s

Team Yard Cottage

The chalk quarry near the dockyard gate, between New Cut and Westcourt Street housed a Teamster’s Yard and Stables for horses used in the Dockyard.

1870s

Temeraire Manor

Between Middle Street and Wood Street, built in the 1950s. Named after HMS Temeraire.

1955-present

The Cut

Another name for New Cut

1830s?-present

The Paddock

Field on the Inner Lines between Sally Port and Maxwell Road. Named from the fact that the Royal Engineers Riding School kept horses here. Also known as Walnut Tree Field.

1950s-present

Trinity Close

A small close off Garden Street between Holy Trinity Church and the rear of Prospect Row.

1930s?-1960s

Trinity Cottage

In Garden Street, next to Holy Trinity Church.

1900s

Trinity House

Probably the name for the parsonage in Military Road south of Trinity Church and School.

1870s

Upper Paddock

The field on Amherst Hill south of the Garrison Church. Named from the fact that the Royal Engineers Riding School kept horses here. Also known as Buttercup Field.

1960s-1990s

Victoria Street

Location unknown, but a directory of 1840 lists two businesses in Victoria Street, Brompton

1840

Victory Manor

Between Middle Street and Wood Street, built in the 1950s. Named after HMS Victory.

1955-present

Vine Cottage

Lower Wood Street.

1870s

Walnut (Tree) House

House on Gymnasium Field used as officers married quarters. Probably gets its name from the nearby plantation of Walnut Trees.

1930s-1954

Walnut Tree Field

Sometimes just ‘Walnut Field.’ Field on the Inner Lines between Sally Port and Maxwell Road. Got its name from the avenue of Walnut Trees that ran along its western edge, probably planted there in the early to mid 18th century. In the early 20th century it was sometimes also applied to the section of the Inner Lines between Wood Street and Sally Port.

c.1900-1960s

West Court

It seems Westcout Alley was sometimes just called West Court.

1870s-1900s

West Road

Road inside Brompton Barracks to the west of Gordon Road.

1840s?-present

Westcourt Alley

An alley running from Westcourt Street towards new cut above the old chalk quarry that housed the Dockyard Teamster’s Yard.

1860s

Westcourt Manor/Farm

Brompton is built on the demesne grounds of Westcourt Manor. The Manor House and Farm stood at the junction of Brompton Lane and the old Chatham to Gillingham Road. It was demolished c.1800 and its modern location would be at the corner of the alley from Sally Port Gardens to Brompton Road on the Army football pitches.

Medieval-c.1800

Westcourt Place 

Off Westcourt Street. May be another name for Westcourt Alley

1880s

Westcourt Street

Runs from the High Street to Dock Road. May once have led directly into the Dockyard. Named for Westcourt Manor which Brompton was a part of. Part of Rogers’ original grid plan.

c.1697-present

Westgate Street

On directory of 1826 mentions a property located in Westgate Street, Brompton. The name is otherwise unknown and is probably a printer’s error for Westcourt Street.

1826

Wood Street

Runs along the northern edge off Brompton to the site of Westcourt Manor House. Named because it ran along the southern edge of Brompton Wood. Some or all of it may have been known as Carpenter’s Lane in the 18th century. Probably laid out by Rogers for the building of Brompton, perhaps along the course of an earlier lane. Part of Rogers’ original grid plan. Its course was altered in the 1750s to pass through the Brompton Barrier.

17th C.-present

Wood Street, Lower

The western part of Wood Street on the hill from the High Street to Dock Road/River Street. Was part of Chatham until c.1905.

c.1850-c.1880

Wood Street, Upper

The eastern part of Wood Street from the High Street to the Brompton Barrier.

c.1860-c.1880

 

 

Note

This list is currently incomplete as it is a work in progress, particularly in terms of the various courts and yards and the dates involved for them.

 
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Comments

any ideas about a milliners or dressmakers in 123 Canterbury Street, Old Brompton in 1890s?

Linda - 12/09/2014 23:18

I was born in the military s hospital in 1949.and lived in
14sallyport gardens till 1954.

Ian.donner - 27/01/2015 16:10

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